Monthly Archives

January 2016

Vandalism suspected as historic tall ship Defender sinks in Townsville

Vandalism Suspected as Historic Tall Ship Defender Sinks in Townsville

By | News

A 120-Year-Old Sailing Ship Has Sunk At Its Moorings In North Queensland.

People arriving to work in Townsville this morning were surprised to find the 35-metre tall ship Defender submerged at a wharf on Ross Creek in the city’s CBD.

The hull of the vessel was completely submerged, while its rigging remained above the water.

Maritime Safety Queensland has cordoned off the site.

Ship owner Les Dick, who is based in Tasmania, said it had been “gut wrenching” to hear the news this morning.

“We do suspect it’s been an act of vandalism or such leading to the sinking of the vessel,” Mr Dick said.

“We won’t know until we refloat the boat … but at the moment that’s what the people up there are saying.”

The Defender has been in Townsville for more than seven years after it was damaged in an engine room fire.

Mr Dick said he was going to travel to Townsville this week to inspect the damage.

“Our next attack will be to get some competent people around us and some pumps, sandbags, and at the low tide this week, when the deck’s exposed, we’ll simply pump the boat out and refloat it again,” he said.

“We hope it’s that simple … then it will be moved from that location to another.

“We’ve got a lot of support up there … so we’ll do whatever we can to save the old girl, but it’s heart wrenching that this [has] happened to a great old ship like that.”

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Defender The Last Ship Of Its Kind

The Defender was built in 1895 and used as a trading vessel between the colonies.

In 1923 the Defender entered the history books with a record-breaking crossing of Bass Strait, and in World War II it was used to transport troops and supplies.

Mr Dick bought the vessel in 1982, and it was restored to take part in the bicentenary re-enactment of the sailing of the First Fleet into Sydney Harbour in 1988, as well as the Bicentenary Tall Ships Race from Hobart to Sydney.

It was a charter boat in the Whitsundays for a number of years before it arrived in Townsville and fell into disrepair.

Mr Dick said the Defender was the last of the Bass Strait ketches.

“She’s the absolute last one. When she goes that’s the end of it all and that’s the end of an era,” he said.

“[It’s] a bloody beautiful boat, a beautiful boat and it was restored with a lot of love and care and a lot of Tasmanians helped, donated to get it going in 1988.

“I think it did Tasmania proud in the bicentenary and it’s been a representative for Tasmania wherever it’s gone in Australia.”

Mr Dick said the boat’s future looked grim.

“It’s been in the stage up there where I really should’ve moved it back to Tasmania, but things have stopped me from doing that,” he said.

“I’m in a state of confusion about the whole thing and I’m very upset about it. It will take me a day or two to settle down and get my mind around all this.

“The last thing we would want is for such an historic vessel to end up going to the tip. It would be an absolute tragedy.”

ABC North QLD – Tuesday 4th January 2016 – Article available here

Launch of Shipping Industry’s Cyber Security Guidelines

By | News

BIMCO has introduced guidelines to assist the global shipping industry prevent cyber security breaches onboard ships. These guidelines are the first of this nature for the shipping industry. These guidelines focus on detailing the cyber risks that may occur along with measures to prevent such risks. The guidelines also assist in how to deal with these risks should they unfortunately occur.

Download the Cyber Security Guidelines

*PRESS RELEASE*

4th January 2016

Cyber security guidelines for ships launched today.

BIMCO, together with other leading shipping organisations, has today launched a set of guidelines to help the global shipping industry prevent major safety, environmental and commercial issues that could result from a cyber incident onboard a ship.

The cyber guidelines launched today are a first for the shipping industry, developed by international shipping associations, comprising BIMCO, CLIA, ICS, INTERCARGO and INTERTANKO – and with support from a wide range of stakeholders. The Guidelines on Cyber Security Onboard Ships are free to download from the BIMCO website.

Angus Frew, Secretary General of BIMCO, said:

“BIMCO has led the way to identify potential cyber vulnerabilities for ships – and their implications – based on the latest expert research.”

“The aim is to provide the shipping industry with clear and comprehensive information on cyber security risks to ships enabling shipowners to take measures to protect against attacks and to deal with the eventuality of cyber incidents.”

Cyber threats are changing all the time – and BIMCO and the other industry associations will regularly update the cyber guidelines to ensure shipping companies have the latest information available.

Angus Frew added:

“The guidelines launched today should help companies take a risk-based approach to cyber security that is specific to their business and the ships they operate.”

ENDS

Further information can be found on the BIMCO website.